RTB In the Media

New mobile app diagnoses crop diseases in the field and alerts rural farmers

Researchers who developed a new mobile application that uses artificial intelligence to accurately diagnose crop diseases in the field have won a $100,000 award to help expand their project to help millions of small-scale farmers across Africa. Cassava brown streak disease is spreading westward across the African continent and, together with cassava mosaic disease, threatens the food […]

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Saving the world – Nature editorial

A long and almost uncrossable distance separates fundamental plant research carried out predominantly in rich countries, and the production of better crops in the fields of poor farmers from developing regions. A unique network of international organizations involved in global agriculture helps bridge that chasm.  Continue reading on Nature Plants

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BASICS targets sustainable seed system to transform cassava production

Stakeholders in the seed sector have been advised on the need to work towards a sustainable seed system in Nigeria. Project Director, Building an Economically Sustainable Integrated Cassava Seed System (BASICS), Hemant Nitturkar, who made the call at a national stakeholder conference on cassava seed system, held at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), […]

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Uganda: Search for Ways to Improve Cassava Shelf Life

Millions of Uganda rely on cassava not only for food security but as a means of livelihood. However, an issue of concern is its shelf life. To address this, a research is being conducted on technologies to enable longer storage of cassava as well as the economic feasibility. Known as RTB-Endure, the project is implemented […]

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Stakeholders combat banana bunchy top disease

The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) has intensified efforts aimed at preventing the further spread of Banana Bunchy Top Disease, that is debilitating banana production in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease, first discovered in Nigeria, in Odologun community, in Yewa South council area in 2012 by IITA in collaboration with University of Ibadan and Nigerian […]

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Nigeria: $11.6m for Sustainable Cassava Seed System

A four-year $11.6m project ending 2019 to develop a commercially sustainable cassava seed value chain in Nigeria, was recently launched at the headquarters of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, Nigeria. Titled ‘Building Sustainable, Integrated Seed System for Cassava in Nigeria’ the project funded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is led […]

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New Project To Build Commercially Sustainable Cassava Seed System In Nigeria

A four-year project (2015 – 2019) to develop a commercially sustainable cassava seed value chain in Nigeria, was officially launched Monday 18 April at a public event at the headquarters of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, Nigeria. Titled ‘Building a Sustainable, Integrated Seed System for Cassava in Nigeria’ (BASICS), the $USD11.6 […]

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Uganda: High post harvest losses in cooking bananas

Cooking banana is the main staple crop in Uganda produced mostly by smallholders for food and income. However, the cooking banana value chain players face risks of high postharvest losses due to the short green life of bananas and damage arising from poor handling of the produce after it is harvested, leading to high physical […]

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Making use of sweetpotato vines as silage

When James Francis Ojakol enrolled for a Master degree in animal science at Makerere University, he had no idea how he would finance his studies nor what area to study. An opportunity from International Potato Center (CIP) to fund a research project fell into his lap. Uganda is hosting a three-year $4m (Shs13.4b) project, funded […]

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Agri-food systems research and poverty in Ghana

In Ghana, small scale farmers are national assets. They form the bulk of the workforce in the agricultural sector, which is totally dependent on water availability and are the ones feeding the nation. But the sector is no longer as productive as it used to be – shrinking land for farming due to increasing population, […]

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Is cassava the key to tomorrow’s food security?

Huyen Thi Phuc, a small-scale farmer in southern Vietnam, has grown cassava and cashew nuts for 15 years. The cassava, a root crop, brings in more than half her income. She grows it because it doesn’t require heavy labor or fertilizer, and it’s one of the few crops that grow in the poor soil on […]

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SciDev – Africa’s top science stories from first half of 2015

As 2015 comes to an end, we highlight science articles published by SciDev.Net’s Sub-Saharan Africa English regional edition that were most popular with our audiences by the end of June. Many top stories had agricultural ‘flavor’, which attests to the huge impact of agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa, but other stories that many readers viewed included […]

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“Orphan Crops”: What They Are, Why They Matter and What’s Being Done

Ever wake up craving some finger millet, or sit down in front of a movie with some nice groundnut? Probably not. Finger millet and groundnut, along with tef, yam, cassava, and others, are part of a class of crops that’s often called “orphan crops” because they tend to receive less attention. Orphan crops may not […]

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Farmers trained in silage production

Some 28 agriculture officials and farmers have been trained in silage production for pigs at Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute, Kabanyolo, Uganda, containing sweetpotato vines and unwanted roots. The training, sweetpotato production, management and utilization workshop for training of trainers was organised by the International Potato Center (CIP) and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). […]

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The potential of cassava in the “new” economy of Nigeria

Facing declining oil prices, the Nigerian government has reached out to identify new sources of income and explore new markets. Investments in agriculture look promising. Many local industries depend heavily on cassava and Nigeria is the biggest cassava grower in the world. However, cassava yields are comparatively low. The Economist, in a recent special article […]

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Uganda selected as focus for project on root crops, bananas

Uganda is hosting a $4m (Shs11.4b) project that will expand the utilisation of roots, tubers and bananas and reduce their post harvest losses. The three-year European Union (EU) funded project is implemented by the CGIAR Research Programme on Roots, Tubers and Bananas. It focus on cassava, bananas, sweet potatoes and Irish potatoes. Publishing date: 2015-02-04 […]

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Project seeks to add value to roots, tubers and bananas

Researchers are implementing a new project to explore increased use of roots, tubers and bananas (RTBs) and technologies to reduce their postharvest losses in Uganda. A workshop to highlight the research activities to be undertaken was organised last month (1-3 December) in Ntinda, Uganda. The European Union is funding the US$4 million, three-year project that […]

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Scientists embark on fighting deadly banana disease

A group of scientists has embarked on a strategy to prevent the spread of a deadly banana fungal disease following an outbreak in Mozambique. Tropical race 4 (TR4), a strain of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, and responsible for a deadly banana wilt disease, was detected last year on a 1,500-hectare farm in Mozambique that grows […]

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CGIAR: A maps application, developed with scientific crowdsourcing, identifies priority areas for crops.

Many people in the developing world struggle with hunger, food insecurity, poverty and threats to their livelihoods. In response, the Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research, an organization that coordinates agricultural research internationally, set up the Roots, Tubers and Bananas for Food Security and Income program, which identifies endangered areas and highlights opportunities for improving […]

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Manioc : un réseau de surveillance des maladies en Afrique

Vingt-huit organisations internationales viennent de s’associer pour mieux lutter contre les maladies du manioc en Afrique. Le réseau PACSUN (Pan-African Cassava Surveillance Network) ainsi formé ambitionne de prévenir une éventuelle catastrophe alimentaire puisque, sur le continent, le manioc est de plus en plus central dans la subsistance des populations. Publisher: http://www.newspress.fr/ Publishing date: 2014-08-14 Read […]

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