Toolbox to understand and enhance root, tuber and banana seed systems

A suite of tools for understanding root, tuber and banana seed systems are helping document and guide the implementation of on-going seed interventions.

Root, tuber and banana crops are clonally propagated, meaning they are grown by planting tubers, suckers, stalks, or vine cuttings, referred to as ‘seed’. This presents several challenges for farmers, including low seed multiplication rates, bulky and perishable planting material and rapid seed degeneration leading to low crop yields.

RTB centers have collaborated to develop tools that allow practitioners to understand and systemically diagnose seed systems and determine how to effectively intervene in them. In 2017, experts from Wageningen University and the RTB centers met to incorporate and describe these tools in a single toolbox using a standard format.

“This toolbox is a much-needed guide, a collection of 14 tools that enables researchers to come to grips with the seed systems of vegetatively propagated crops, and to overcome social, economic and market constraints,” said Jorge Andrade-Piedra, seed expert and plant pathologist at the International Potato Center (CIP). The toolbox is being validated in 14 projects in Asia, Africa, and South America across all major RTB crops.

One of the tools, a ‘multi-stakeholder framework for intervening in root, tuber and banana seed systems’ will be used in all locations to allow the designers of new seed projects to identify the major stakeholders, their roles, and critical bottlenecks of vegetatively propagated seed systems. So far, the framework is being used in ongoing interventions in Nigeria for cassava, in India for potato, in Ethiopia for sweetpotato, and in Uganda for banana. It has allowed researchers to organize multi-stakeholder workshops to analyze the seed system, identify appropriate interventions and to guide the design of household questionnaires to probe deeper into key constraints to seed use.

Continue reading the story in the RTB 2017 Annual Report: From science to scaling